Archive for July 2015

 

Teething is one of the first rituals of life. Although newborns usually have no visible teeth, most baby teeth begin to appear generally about six months after birth. During the first few years of your child’s life, all 20 baby teeth will push through the gums and most children will have their full set of these teeth in place by age 3. A baby’s front four teeth usually erupt or

There may be a new fruit you should add to your diet.

Recent studies have shown that pomegranates have numerous health benefits. The pomegranate is a fleshy red fruit containing numerous vibrant seeds. It is seen in salads, in addition to the numerous pomegranates juices that have been developed in recent years.

The antibacterial qualities in the pomegranates may serve to thwart dental plaque. Therefore, pomegranates may lower the chances of developing tooth decay and gum disease.

Pomegranates also can curb overall inflammation,

 

Your mouth is your body’s initial point of contact with the nutrients you consume. So naturally, what you put in your mouth impacts not only your general health but also the health of your teeth and gums. Did you know that certain foods can put you at risk for cavities and other oral health problems? Here are some MouthHealthy tips. Remember: If your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your oral health.

According to MyPlate, a website from the Center for

If one or more of your teeth are missing, there are a number of ways to replace them. An alternative to bridges, partials or complete dentures may be dental implants. Implants are used to replace missing roots and support artificial replacement teeth. They are comfortable and look like natural teeth.

What are dental implants?

A dental implant is an artificial root made of titanium metal. It is inserted into the jawbone to replace the root of the natural tooth.

 

Many of us brush our teeth on autopilot, but our teeth and gums need TLC if you want to keep them healthy.

And you know you’re not fooling anyone at the dentist’s office when you say you floss regularly--they can tell whether you are or not, and in truth, you’re only cheating yourself of good health with poor dental hygiene.

Break your bad brush habits before it’s too late.

Teenagers can be tough on their teeth. They may be so busy with school, jobs, sports and social activities that they don't find time to brush. They also tend to eat a lot of junk food. Combine the two and you've got a situation ripe for tooth decay. Not surprisingly, many teenagers develop a lot of cavities.

The association between poor oral health and increased risk of cardiovascular disease should make the reduction of sugars such as those contained in junk food, particularly fizzy drinks, an important health policy target, say experts writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.
 

Poor oral hygiene and excess sugar consumption can lead to periodontal disease where the supporting bone around the teeth is destroyed. It is thought that chronic infection from gum disease can trigger an inflammatory response that leads to heart disease through a process called atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Despite convincing evidence linking poor oral health to premature heart disease, the most recent UK national guidance on the prevention of CVD at population level mentions the reduction of sugar only indirectly.

It may benefit children to see a dentist before age 4, a study published in Pediatric Dentistry revealed.

The study, “Do Early Dental Visits Reduce Treatment and Treatment Costs for Children?” which appears in the November/December edition of the journal, offers evidence that early intervention efforts in oral health are both clinically effective and cost effective, according to researchers.

“The takeaway message is early intervention does work,” said Dr. Arthur J. Nowak, lead study author and a professor emeritus at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Iowa.

Researchers examined a year’s worth of billing data for 42,532 children aged 0 to 7 from 20 corporate treatment centers serving children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. About 40 percent of those children were early starters, or had seen a dentist before age 4, while the rest were late starters, having seen a dentist for the first time at or after age 4.

Dental caries, commonly known as tooth decay, is the single most common chronic childhood disease. In fact, it is an infectious disease. Mothers with cavities can transmit caries-producing oral bacteria to their babies when they clean pacifiers by sticking them in their own mouths or by sharing spoons.