Posts Under Childhood dental care

There are many ways to help your kids have better dental health. You can encourage your kids to brush at least twice a day and floss once a day. You can take them for regular dental checkups every six months. You can make sure they avoid sugary treats and juices. But good nutrition for kids is one of the easiest ways to improve dental health. Here are 5 foods you can add to your child's diet to help them have healthier teeth, based on recommendations from the American Dental Association (ADA):

Tooth decay is an infectious disease — and it is a reality. All children are at risk. The ODA Special Report Tooth Decay in Ontario's Children: An Ounce of Prevention -- A Pound of Cure is a call to action for parents, government and the community — we all need to work together on prevention. 

 

Tooth Decay Facts: Did you know?

 

  • it is the second most common cause of school absenteeism
  • it is five times more common than asthma in children age 5-17
  • it can be transmitted by sharing a spoon with young children or licking their pacifier
  • it is preventable in almost all cases

 

If you want to maintain strong teeth for your lifetime, you need to ensure you are eating enough whole grain breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables and lean meats.

Some other healthy snack choices include:

  • nuts and seeds
  • peanut butter
  • cheese
  • plain yogurt
  • popcorn

 

What Is It?

 

 

A sealant is a clear or tinted plastic protective coating for teeth. It is painted onto the chewing surfaces of the back teeth (molars and premolars). These are the areas where most cavities form.

Molars and premolars have grooves and crevices. Dentists call these pits and fissures. Food can get stuck in these crevices. Some are so deep that the bristles of a toothbrush can't reach in

to them.

Grooves and crevices provide the perfect environment for bacteria to grow and cause cavities. Sealants help to prevent this from happening. They cover the grooves and crevices so that food cannot get into them.

 

Healthy gums and teeth are important to your child's overall health. This is why your child's doctor will talk with you about good dental habits even before your child's first tooth appears.  
 

Once your child has a tooth, your doctor may recommend that your child receive fluoride varnish treatments in the pediatrician's office to help prevent tooth decay. This can be done 2 to 4 times per year. The number of treatments depends on how likely it is that your child may get a cavity.  
 

Pediatricians are trained to apply fluoride varnish because many young children do not see or have access to a dentist until they are older. If your child is seeing a dentist at a young age, as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, fluoride varnish may be applied in a dental office instead. 

Read on for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics about fluoride varnish.

Brush, Book, Bed, a program of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), has a simple and clear message for parents:

  1. Each night, help your children to brush their teeth.
  2. Read a favorite book (or two)!
  3. Get to bed at a regular time each night.

Having a predictable nighttime routine will help them understand and learn to expect what comes next. Additionally, routines may ease the stress that some families experience at nighttime.

 

Teething is one of the first rituals of life. Although newborns usually have no visible teeth, most baby teeth begin to appear generally about six months after birth. During the first few years of your child’s life, all 20 baby teeth will push through the gums and most children will have their full set of these teeth in place by age 3. A baby’s front four teeth usually erupt or

It may benefit children to see a dentist before age 4, a study published in Pediatric Dentistry revealed.

The study, “Do Early Dental Visits Reduce Treatment and Treatment Costs for Children?” which appears in the November/December edition of the journal, offers evidence that early intervention efforts in oral health are both clinically effective and cost effective, according to researchers.

“The takeaway message is early intervention does work,” said Dr. Arthur J. Nowak, lead study author and a professor emeritus at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Iowa.

Researchers examined a year’s worth of billing data for 42,532 children aged 0 to 7 from 20 corporate treatment centers serving children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. About 40 percent of those children were early starters, or had seen a dentist before age 4, while the rest were late starters, having seen a dentist for the first time at or after age 4.

Dental caries, commonly known as tooth decay, is the single most common chronic childhood disease. In fact, it is an infectious disease. Mothers with cavities can transmit caries-producing oral bacteria to their babies when they clean pacifiers by sticking them in their own mouths or by sharing spoons.


Fluoride is a mineral found in soil, water (both fresh a

nd salt) and various foods. It has a positive effect on oral health by making teeth more resistant to decay. Fluoride can also prevent or even reverse tooth decay that has started.

Fluorides are used by communities as a public health measure to adjust the concentration of fluoride in drinking water to an optimum level (community water fluoridation); by individuals in the form of toothpastes, rinses, lozenges, chewable tablets, drops; and by the dental profession in the professional application of gels, foams and varnishes.

The availability of fluorides from a variety of sources must be taken into account before embarking on a specific course of fluoride delivery. This is particularly important for children under the age of 6, where exposure to more fluoride than is required to simply prevent dental caries can cause dental fluorosis. Provided that the total daily intake of fluoride is carefully monitored, fluoride is considered to be a most important health measure in maintaining oral health.

Your dentist is able to assess your child's risk of developing tooth decay and advise you of an appropriate level of fluoride protection.

 

Src: www.cda-adc.ca/en/oral_health/cfyt/dental_care_children/fluoride.asp

Good childhood dental care starts with regular visits to the dentist’s office. You can make that first appointment when the first teeth erupt, or at least by the time your child turns one. Why are early visits so important? Recognizing the early signs of tooth decay in children is not always easy. Your dentist can tell you how your little one’s teeth are doing and recommend anything to help protect against decay, like fluoride treatments or dental sealants. Also, it doesn’t hurt to get a few oral care pointers from a dental professional. Don’t be afraid to ask questions that could help you take better care of your child’s teeth.

Teaching your child proper oral care at a young age is an investment in his or her health that will pay lifelong dividends. You can start by setting an example; taking good care of your own teeth sends a message that oral health is something to be valued. And anything that makes taking care of teeth fun, like brushing along with your child or letting them choose their own toothbrush, encourages proper oral care.

To help your children protect their teeth and gums and greatly reduce their risk of getting cavities, teach them to follow these simple steps:

  • Brush twice a day with an ADA — accepted fluoride toothpaste to remove plaque-the sticky film on teeth that’s the main cause of tooth decay.
  • Floss daily to remove plaque from between your teeth and under the gum line, before it can harden into tartar. Once tartar has formed, it can only be removed by a professional cleaning.
  • Eat a well-balanced diet that limits starchy or sugary foods, which produce plaque acids that cause tooth decay. When you do eat these foods, try to eat them with your meal instead of as a snack-the extra saliva produced during a meal helps rinse food from the mouth.
  • Use dental products that contain fluoride, including toothpaste.
  • Make sure that your children’s drinking water is fluoridated. If your water supply; municipal, well or bottled does not contain fluoride, your dentist or paediatrician may prescribe daily fluoride supplements.
  • Take your child to the dentist for regular checkups.