Posts Under Dental Care Every Day

As a woman you know that your health needs are unique. You know that brushing and flossing daily, diet, exercise and regular visits to your doctor and dentist are all important to help you stay in good shape. You also know that at specific times in your life, you need to take extra care of yourself. Times when you mature and change, for example, puberty or menopause, and times when you have special health needs, such as menstruation or pregnancy.
 

Did you know that your oral health needs change at these times too?
 

During these particular times, your body experiences hormonal changes. These changes can affect many of the tissues in your body, including your gums. Your gums can become sensitive, and at times react strongly to the hormonal fluctuations. This may make you more susceptible to gum disease.
 

What is gum disease?
 

Gum disease, or periodontal disease, is caused by the bacteria and toxins in dental plaque, a sticky colourless film that constantly forms on the teeth. Gum disease affects the gums and supporting structures of the teeth. The earliest stage of gum disease, gingivitis, usually causes the gum tissue to swell, turn red and bleed easily. There is usually little or no pain at this time.

Sometimes swelling and bleeding can be seen only by the dentist. If left untreated, gum disease can progress to a more serious stage where the bone and tissue surrounding the teeth are damaged or destroyed. If still not treated, teeth eventually become loose and may be lost.

Your teeth and the structure of your mouth play important roles in your ability to eat and speak and stay healthy.

 

Most of us take our teeth for granted … until something goes wrong. Our teeth help us chew and digest food, play an important role in speech, and impact our health overall. And by brushing up on your dental health knowledge, you’ll be taking the first step toward giving your teeth the attention they deserve.

How much do you know about your pearly whites?

 

The Development of Teeth

 

Humans have two sets of teeth, primary (or baby) teeth and then permanent teeth, which develop in stages. Although the timing is different, the development of each of these sets of teeth is similar. Here are some facts about how people develop teeth:

  • Teeth tend to erupt in parallel, meaning that the top molar on your left side should grow in at about the same time as the top molar on the right.
  • Tooth development begins long before your first tooth becomes visible. For example, a baby’s first tooth appears at around six months of age, but development of those teeth actually begins during the early second trimester of pregnancy.
  • The crown of a tooth forms first, while the roots continue to develop even after the tooth has erupted.
  • The 20 primary teeth are in place by age 3 and remain until around 6 years of age when they begin to fall out to make way for the permanent set of teeth.
  • Adult teeth start to grow in between 6 and 12 years of age. Most adults have 32 permanent teeth.
  • Permanent teeth are larger and take longer to grow in than primary teeth.

 

 

The Parts o the Tooth

 

A tooth is divided into two basic parts: the crown, which is the visible, white part of the tooth, and the root, which you can’t see. The root extends below the gum line and anchors the tooth into the bone. Your teeth contain four kinds of tissue and each does a different job. These include:

 

  • Enamel. Enamel is the visible substance that covers the tooth crown. Harder than bone, enamel protects the tooth from decay. Enamel is made up of phosphorous and calcium.
  • Dentin. Underneath the enamel you find dentin, which is calcified and looks similar to bone. Dentin is not quite as hard as enamel, so it is at greater risk for decay should the enamel wear away.
  • Cementum. This tissue covers the tooth root and helps anchor it (cement it) into the bone. It is softer than enamel and dentin; the best way to protect this softer tissue from decay is by taking good care of your gums. Cementum has a light yellow color and is usually covered by the gums. But with inadequate dental care, the gums may become diseased and shrink, exposing the cementum to harmful plaque and bacteria.
  • Pulp. Pulp is found at the center of your tooth and contains the blood vessels, nerves, and other soft tissues that deliver nutrients and signals to your teeth.

 

 

Types of Teeth and What They Do

 

Teeth help you chew your food, making it easier to digest. Each type of tooth has a slightly different shape and performs a different job. Types of teeth include:

  • Incisors. Incisors are the eight teeth in the front and center of your mouth (four on top and four on bottom). These are the teeth that you use to take bites of your food. Incisors are usually the first teeth to erupt, at around 6 months of age for your first set of teeth, and between 6 and 8 years of age for your adult set.
  • Canines. Your four canines are the next type of teeth to develop. These are your sharpest teeth and are used for ripping and tearing food apart. Primary canines generally appear between 16 and 20 months of age with the upper canines coming in just ahead of the lower canines. In permanent teeth, the order is reversed. Lower canines erupt around age 9 with the uppers arriving between 11 and 12 years of age.
  • Premolars. Premolars, or bicuspids, are used for chewing and grinding food. You have four premolars on each side of your mouth, two on the upper and two on the lower jaw. The first premolars appear around age 10 and the second premolars arrive about a year later.
  • Molars. Primary molars are also used for chewing and grinding food. These appear between 12 and 15 months of age. These molars, also known as decidious molars, are replaced by the first and second permanent premolars (four upper and four lower). The permanent molars do not replace, but come in behind the primary teeth. The first molars erupt around 6 years of age (before the primary molars fall out) while the second molars come in between 11 and 13 years of age.
  • Third molars. Third molars are commonly known as wisdom teeth. These are the last teeth to develop and do not typically erupt until age 18 to 20, and some people never develop third molars at all. For those who do, these molars may cause crowding and need to be removed.

Your mouth is important. Don’t take your teeth or oral health for granted. For good dental health, brush and floss your teeth regularly, don't smoke, eat a healthy diet, and see your dentist regularly for dental cleanings and checkups. A healthy mouth makes for a healthy body ... and a pretty smile.

 

 

Src:Dental health . everyday health . Connie Brichford | Medically reviewed by Christine Wilmsen Craig, MD . 28Nov2011 .  web . 7Sep2015

What Do Sore Gums Mean?

Millions of Americans have experienced sore gums. You're brushing or flossing and notice a painful sensation in your gums. Sometimes, your sore gums may even start bleeding while you're brushing or flossing. 

 

Since the pain from sore gums isn’t usually very severe, and it’s such a common problem, many people don’t pay much attention to sore gums. Fortunately, addressing sore gums isn’t usually very difficult, especially in the early stages of gum disease.

 

Sore Gums And Gum Disease

Sore gums, or gums that are swollen or bleeding, are most often linked to gum disease. There are two stages of gum disease, both of which may cause sore gums.

  • Gingivitis: This is the early and mildest form of gum disease; sore gums are often one of the first signs that you may be suffering from gingivitis. If left untreated, gingivitis can lead to more serious gum disease. (1)
  • Periodontitis: Advanced form of gum disease with more serious implications, such as possible tooth loss and other health problems. (2)

If you notice sore gums, consult with a dental professional for evaluation and advice.

 

Stop The Pain From Sore Gums

When you notice sore gums, here are a few things to consider that might help you pinpoint the cause of your discomfort.

  • Am I eating right? A healthy and well-balanced diet can help prevent sore gums and gum disease. A diet that includes plenty of Vitamin C and calcium may minimize your risk for gum problems. (3)
  • Do I use tobacco? Tobacco use has been associated with gum disease and increases your risk for sore gums.
  • Am I stressed out or overwhelmed? Stress raises the levels of cortisol in your body, which increases the likelihood of inflammation. Inflamed, sore gums can be a side effect of a stressful lifestyle.
  • Do I take proper care of my teeth and gums? Maintaining a diligent oral hygiene routine is the best way to keep your teeth healthy and help prevent sore gums.

In conclusion, sore gums can be a warning sign of gum disease and should be taken seriously. Early gum disease can progress to serious infection that can cause tooth loss and may have other overall health implications. Taking good care of your teeth and gums will help you maintain good oral health now and in the future. 

 

 

Src: General Oral Hygiene . Oral Care Topics  . Crest . web . 7Sep2015

There are many ways to help your kids have better dental health. You can encourage your kids to brush at least twice a day and floss once a day. You can take them for regular dental checkups every six months. You can make sure they avoid sugary treats and juices. But good nutrition for kids is one of the easiest ways to improve dental health. Here are 5 foods you can add to your child's diet to help them have healthier teeth, based on recommendations from the American Dental Association (ADA):

 

Do you know how many bacteria live on your toothbrush? Brace yourself! Researchers have found that a single toothbrush can be loaded with as many as 10 million germs and bacteria. In fact, recent studies even found that your toothbrush could be a breeding ground for tiny microorganisms.

 

If you want to maintain strong teeth for your lifetime, you need to ensure you are eating enough whole grain breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables and lean meats.

Some other healthy snack choices include:

  • nuts and seeds
  • peanut butter
  • cheese
  • plain yogurt
  • popcorn

 

Health concerns about fat and cholesterol have prompted many people to become vegetarians, and the nutritional deficiencies that can sometimes result may reveal themselves during dental exams.

 

Academy of General Dentistry spokesperson Ludwig Leibsohn, DDS says he usually asks patients if they adhere to vegetarian or other special diets.

 

"Most adult vegetarians are very knowledgeable about nutrition," says Dr. Leibsohn. "They maintain their diets in a proper fashion."

 

What Is It?

 

 

A sealant is a clear or tinted plastic protective coating for teeth. It is painted onto the chewing surfaces of the back teeth (molars and premolars). These are the areas where most cavities form.

Molars and premolars have grooves and crevices. Dentists call these pits and fissures. Food can get stuck in these crevices. Some are so deep that the bristles of a toothbrush can't reach in

to them.

Grooves and crevices provide the perfect environment for bacteria to grow and cause cavities. Sealants help to prevent this from happening. They cover the grooves and crevices so that food cannot get into them.

 

You're late for work, skip breakfast and during the commute, pick up a doughnut and cup of coffee and you're on your way. This common quick-fix breakfast scenario can lengthen your time spent in the dental chair, reports the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), an organization of general dentists dedicated to continuing dental education.

 

The sugars in doughnuts have been identified as a risk factor for gum inflammation and cavities. The AGD has reported findings that show the sugars in oatmeal cookies amount to only one-fifth of the sugars in plain doughnut particles.

Have you ever wondered why the American Dental Association and your dentist recommend you come back every six months? It’s because regular dental visits are essential for the maintenance of healthy teeth and gums. And in between those examinations, it’s important that you work to keep your teeth and gums clean and healthy. If you need additional help, your dentist may even suggest more frequent visits.

 

What Goes on During a Regular Visit

 

Checking your teeth for tooth decay is just one part of a thorough dental examination. During your checkup appointment, your dentist (or dental hygienist) will likely evaluate the health of your gums, perform a head and

Dr Alldritt said it was particularly alarming to find those who were aware of the Dentists are warning high levels of sugar and acids in many sports drinks can have a harmful impact on a person's oral health.
 

Australian Dental Association [ADA] committee chair Dr Peter Alldritt said players should stick to water to avoid erosion and tooth decay.

"People sometimes drink sports drinks thinking they are healthier than a soft drink," he said.
 

"They can contain six to eight teaspoons of sugar in one drink, which is not far behind some soft drinks."

An ADA survey of 1,200 Australians revealed over 50 per cent of adults and around 30 per cent of children consume sports drinks every week, unaware of the health risks.

dangers still continued to consume the drinks.

He said Australia is recording higher levels of dental diseases than ever before.

In Australia, 50 per cent of children and three out of 10 adults have untreated tooth decay.
 

Sports drinks can leave you thirsty
 

Exercise physiologist Robert Skeat said while sports drinks can help restore electrolyte imbalance, water is the healthiest way to hydrate.

"The high levels of sodium in these drinks leaves you thirsty and the sugar makes them easier to drink," he said.

"They're often sold in gyms and health clubs so we assume they can't be that bad for us."

Dental Health Week begins today with a focus on the oral health habits of active Australians.

Dr Alldritt said it was important to protect teeth from sporting injury by wearing a custom-made mouth guard.

He added it was not case of one-size-fits-all and warned generic guards could cause more damage to a person's teeth.

"Seventy-five per cent of the people we surveyed are just buying a mouth guard over the counter at a sports store or pharmacy," he said.

"These mouth guards don't provide proper protection for your teeth."

Sports Medicine Australia is currently urging sporting organisations to commit to a no mouth guard, no play policy.

 

src: www.abc.net.au / Edwina Seselja

If you suddenly experience symptoms of dry mouth, it may be because you’ve started taking a certain type of medication. Medications are a major cause of dry mouth. In fact, medications cause approximately 90 percent of all cases of dry mouth, according to the Academy of General Dentistry.

 

You may not be able to discontinue your medication,

There may be a new fruit you should add to your diet.

Recent studies have shown that pomegranates have numerous health benefits. The pomegranate is a fleshy red fruit containing numerous vibrant seeds. It is seen in salads, in addition to the numerous pomegranates juices that have been developed in recent years.

The antibacterial qualities in the pomegranates may serve to thwart dental plaque. Therefore, pomegranates may lower the chances of developing tooth decay and gum disease.

Pomegranates also can curb overall inflammation,

 

Your mouth is your body’s initial point of contact with the nutrients you consume. So naturally, what you put in your mouth impacts not only your general health but also the health of your teeth and gums. Did you know that certain foods can put you at risk for cavities and other oral health problems? Here are some MouthHealthy tips. Remember: If your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your oral health.

According to MyPlate, a website from the Center for

If one or more of your teeth are missing, there are a number of ways to replace them. An alternative to bridges, partials or complete dentures may be dental implants. Implants are used to replace missing roots and support artificial replacement teeth. They are comfortable and look like natural teeth.

What are dental implants?

A dental implant is an artificial root made of titanium metal. It is inserted into the jawbone to replace the root of the natural tooth.

 

Many of us brush our teeth on autopilot, but our teeth and gums need TLC if you want to keep them healthy.

And you know you’re not fooling anyone at the dentist’s office when you say you floss regularly--they can tell whether you are or not, and in truth, you’re only cheating yourself of good health with poor dental hygiene.

Break your bad brush habits before it’s too late.

Teenagers can be tough on their teeth. They may be so busy with school, jobs, sports and social activities that they don't find time to brush. They also tend to eat a lot of junk food. Combine the two and you've got a situation ripe for tooth decay. Not surprisingly, many teenagers develop a lot of cavities.

The association between poor oral health and increased risk of cardiovascular disease should make the reduction of sugars such as those contained in junk food, particularly fizzy drinks, an important health policy target, say experts writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.
 

Poor oral hygiene and excess sugar consumption can lead to periodontal disease where the supporting bone around the teeth is destroyed. It is thought that chronic infection from gum disease can trigger an inflammatory response that leads to heart disease through a process called atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Despite convincing evidence linking poor oral health to premature heart disease, the most recent UK national guidance on the prevention of CVD at population level mentions the reduction of sugar only indirectly.

It may benefit children to see a dentist before age 4, a study published in Pediatric Dentistry revealed.

The study, “Do Early Dental Visits Reduce Treatment and Treatment Costs for Children?” which appears in the November/December edition of the journal, offers evidence that early intervention efforts in oral health are both clinically effective and cost effective, according to researchers.

“The takeaway message is early intervention does work,” said Dr. Arthur J. Nowak, lead study author and a professor emeritus at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Iowa.

Researchers examined a year’s worth of billing data for 42,532 children aged 0 to 7 from 20 corporate treatment centers serving children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. About 40 percent of those children were early starters, or had seen a dentist before age 4, while the rest were late starters, having seen a dentist for the first time at or after age 4.

Dental caries, commonly known as tooth decay, is the single most common chronic childhood disease. In fact, it is an infectious disease. Mothers with cavities can transmit caries-producing oral bacteria to their babies when they clean pacifiers by sticking them in their own mouths or by sharing spoons.